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Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 4:55pm

The American Jewish Congress (AJC) issued a statement welcoming Trump’s announcement as well, saying, “This historic acknowledgement by the Trump administration recognizes Jerusalem’s just and rightful position as the heart of the Jewish State and nation.”

 

“The Palestinians have for some time embarked on diplomatic terrorism at international institutions including the UN and UNESCO. In this they were aided by President Obama’s abstention on the anti-Israel UN Security Council resolution last December, which threatened to strain the special relationship between the US and Israel, and sent a dangerous message to the Palestinians that the US was abandoning its longstanding American policy of vetoing unilateral resolutions against Israel. This has served only to entrench attitudes towards the Palestinians by those on the right in America and across the Jewish world. The Palestinians really only have themselves to blame for today’s announcement,” said the statement.

 

“That said, the American Jewish Congress is encouraged by the increased signs of engagement between Israel and Sunni Arab states, which make the prospects of achieving a lasting negotiated peace between Israel and the Palestinians an ever more realistic outcome. The American Jewish Congress looks to the US to continue to lead the way among the international community to facilitate constructive dialogue and actions between Israel and the Palestinians with the aim of reinvigorating the dormant peace process.”

 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 7:12pm

In an interview with Reuters, Jack Rosen, the president of the American Jewish Congress, said Trump's move could offer a breakthrough in peace talks.

 

Rosen said naming Jerusalem as Israel's capital sends two messages: "One to the Palestinians that this could slip away from you, so let's get serious. Try to find a way forward to peace. But it may also send a message to the Israelis – that you can trust this administration; that it will work in a balanced way to find the security that you require and the terms that you require, at the same time satisfy the Palestinians and maybe work towards a solution."

Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 6:55pm

Orlando: I appreciate Jack Rosen’s Op-Ed condemning Bernie Sanders for his repeated anti-Israel messages and constantly aligning himself with anti-Semitic people (“Democratic Party leaders must take on Bernie Sanders on Israel,” Nov. 14). That is the reason I withdrew my support for him. I used to be a Bernie supporter until making the shocking realization that even though he was Jewish, he seemed to hate Israel. That is also the reason I have found myself as an independent losing interest in the Democratic Party. Rosen hit the nail on the head for me. I still care about the environment and health care, but I have become disheartened by the Democrats embracing people like Linda Sarsour and Keith Ellison so much that I have actually become a fan of Donald Trump. I felt, as a Jew, I had to choose between caring about the environment and supporting Israel. I chose Israel. It will take a lot to bring me back. I have also become disheartened to see anti-Israel feelings spreading through college campuses. Glad somebody else realized the damage Bernie is causing.

 

Lisa Tishler

 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 6:52pm

The American Jewish Congress welcomes the US Designation of Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital & the relocation of the Embassy.

 

“The American Jewish Congress welcomes President Trump’s official recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital city and its commitment to relocating the American Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. This historic acknowledgement by the Trump administration recognizes Jerusalem’s just and rightful position as the heart of the Jewish State.

 

“The Palestinians really only have themselves to blame for today’s announcement. The Palestinians have for some time embarked on diplomatic terrorism at international institutions including the UN and UNESCO. In this they were aided by President Obama’s abstention on the anti-Israel UN Security Council resolution last December, which threatened to strain the special relationship between the US and Israel, and sent a dangerous message to the Palestinians that the US was abandoning its longstanding American policy of vetoing unilateral resolutions against Israel. This has served only to entrench attitudes towards the Palestinians by those on the right in America and across the Jewish world.”

 

“That said, the American Jewish Congress is encouraged by the increased signs of engagement between Israel and Sunni Arab states, which make the prospects of achieving a lasting negotiated peace between Israel and the Palestinians an ever more realistic outcome. The American Jewish Congress looks to the US to continue to lead the way among the international community to facilitate constructive dialogue and actions between Israel and the Palestinians with the aim of reinvigorating the dormant peace process.”

 

Jack Rosen, President, American Jewish Congress

 

Munr Kazmir

 

Ben Chouake

 

The American Jewish Congress is committed to ensuring the survival and security of Israel, and protecting Jewish communities around the world

 
Thursday, December 7, 2017 - 6:05pm

United States President Donald Trump is as defiant as ever. He has disregarded global opposition and gone ahead with recognising Jerusalem as the Capital of Israel. This could potentially reverse 70 years of America's Middle East policy. Furthermore, Trump has insisted that the controversial move will not affect his administration's goal of resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The US embassy will now be moved from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Officials have told the press that this process will take up to three years. “I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,” Trump said. “While previous presidents have made this a major campaign promise, they failed to deliver. Today, I am delivering.

 

“My announcement today marks the beginning of a new approach to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.”

Within hours of Trump's announcement, US embassies across several - Great Britain, Germany, Jordan and Turkey - issued security alerts and urged caution.

On Friday, the United Nations Security Council is likely to meet. They will be discussing the move made by Trump. This comes on the heels of a request from eight countries of the 15-member body.

Trump didn't rule out a further division. “We are not taking a position on any final status issues, including the specific boundaries of the Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem, or the resolution of contested borders. Those questions are up to the parties involved".

 

Following the announcement, there were major protests across various cities.

 

“In this moment of great anxiety, I want to make it clear – there is no alternative to the two-state solution,” Guterres continued. “There is no plan B.” Even Pope Francis got in the act. Francis made a plea to Trump to respect status quo and conform to the UN resolutions.

 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan adopted a tough stance on Trump's announcement. The Turkish foreign minister said the US was making a "grave mistake".

 

French President Emmanuel Macron was the first of the Western leaders to condemn the move.

 

Thereafter, British Prime Minister Theresa May joined in, calling the move, "“unhelpful in terms of the prospects for peace in the region”.

Friday, November 17, 2017 - 11:02am
Featured in the Jerusalem Post 
 
Trump’s uncompromising rhetoric has earned him a considerable fan base in Israel, where hisapproval rating is healthier than on his home turf.
 
They say a week is a long time in politics. Well, this past year has seen enough action in the US and around the world to last a lifetime. Looking back over the 12 months since US President Donald Trump gained arguably the most improbable election victory in American history, it is a good time to reflect on what his administration has meant for Jews there and around the world.
 
Trump came into office in the immediate aftermath of predecessor Barack Obama’s parting gift toIsrael at the UN Security Council, where for the first time in US history Israel’s closest ally on the global stage abstained from a vote on Israeli settlement activity. This move caused considerableconsternation among American Jewry, for Obama had turned his back on years of American foreign policy and set the tone for an agenda that threatened to derail America’s bond with Israel.
 
Trump had been vocal in his commitments to Israel on the campaign trail, pledging to overturn hispredecessor’s veto of the anti-settlement resolution at the UNSC, as well as to moving the US Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
 
His new appointee to the role of US ambassador to the UN similarly heralded the start of a new era inthe relationship of the US. In her maiden speech, Nikki Haley insisted the Trump administration would “have the backs of our allies and make sure our allies have our backs as well.” Furthermore, the US would in future abstain from any UN vote on a resolution which sought to “encourage boycotts ofIsrael.”
 
Trump himself seized on the UN’s weakness, choosing his own maiden speech at the General Assembly in September to condemn the UN’s culture of “bureaucracy and mismanagement,” which he argued prevented the body from restoring its once great reputation as a global influencer inpromoting universal human rights and the peaceful coexistence of nations.
 
The Trump administration has similarly been clear in vocalizing its commitment to securing peace between Israel and the Palestinians, suggesting that his own negotiating power offers the US “maybe the best shot ever” of achieving elusive peace. However, there has been little concrete progress in the process.
If he is to realize his lofty ambitions for achieving a strong, stable and secure Israel and the best environment for peace in the region, Trump now has to match strong rhetoric with action. He should begin by taking decisive steps against those questioning Israel’s rights to exist and who advocate aseries of unjustified sanctions and boycotts.
 
Trump’s uncompromising rhetoric has earned him a considerable fan base in Israel, where hisapproval rating is healthier than on his home turf. A largely disillusioned American Jewry is looking for more demonstrable signs of a commitment to action on the Middle East peace process.
 
Meanwhile, an increasingly isolationist agenda on matters of wider foreign policy inhibits American influence on the world stage. The US would better serve its closest ally Israel by preserving its reputation as a global power player.
 
America could repair its somewhat damaged diplomatic prestige to lead a coordinated effort by international nations to secure Israel’s borders and pave the way to achieving peace in the region.
Another area of concern is the growing alt-right in the US and the forces of hatred that the new climate is unleashing. Charlottesville was a debacle that must never recur. Antisemitism must be stamped out wherever it rears its ugly head.
In decertifying the Iran deal – an ill-conceived strategy that went against the interests of Israel, America and all those opposed to terrorism – Trump sent a clear message that dangerous regimes looking to spread terrorism on our doorsteps and throughout the Middle East alike would not be tolerated.
In turning his back on the once-lauded deal, without the support of much of the international community, Trump once again displayed a strong sense of moral courage. Persisting with an ineffective and an unenforceable agreement only risks further instability at what is a key transitional time in the development of Iran’s dangerous plans for the region and the safety of its neighbors and the world.
President Trump has adopted an uncompromising policy on ISIS, which has undoubtedly brought success, declaring only last month that the reason for the US concluding major military operations inRaqqa was as a result of his overhaul of the rules of engagement in the fight against the terrorist group.
In the Trump administration’s most buoyant declaration of victory in the fight against ISIS, he added: “ISIS is now giving up, they are giving up, they are raising their hands, they are walking off.
Nobody has ever seen that before.”
 
While the military is cautious on whether victory has been won in Iraq, Trump still faces myriad foreign policy challenges elsewhere in the region that need addressing urgently. In Lebanon, western powers and moderate alike were alarmed by the resignation of Prime Minister Saad Hariri last week, citing fears over the growing influence of Iranian proxy, Hezbollah.
 
The announcement came amid mounting fears over the consolidation of Iranian influence in Lebanon and was perhaps the most worrying sign to date of the internationally designated terrorist group Hezbollah’s dangerous intentions.
 
America must now look to cooperate with its allies in the region to counter the combined force of Iran and Hezbollah, or else the situation is certain to spiral, increasing the likelihood of a clash with Israelas well as the spread of terrorism throughout the Middle East.
 
Twelve months on, Trump has been true to his word and been a real friend to Israel and taken the fight to the terrorists around the world. While this is deeply encouraging, we cannot avoid the dangers of the increasing alt-right and populist rhetoric. Trump must now condemn unequivocally the forces of bigotry and hatred at home, as staunchly as he has been defending Israel’s interests abroad.
 
The writer is president of the American Jewish Congress.

 

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 3:02pm
Sen. Bernie Sanders has for too long been allowed to attack Israel unchecked. His constant attacks are disproportionate and risk damaging the Democratic Party’s image in the U.S. and abroad. Sanders’ recent claim that the U.S. was “complicit” in Israel’s occupation of Gaza and the West Bank was a case in point. I did not hear one Democratic voice publically challenge this point of view. When will Israel’s supporters within the Party stand up against Sanders and stand up for Israel? Will the new cohort of Democrats elected to office this week stand up for Israel? Sanders’ obsession with bashing Israel is biased, myopic and imbalanced. Is it reasonable to single out Israel while turning a relative blind eye to the terror and hatred tearing through every other Middle Eastern country? Is it reasonable to dedicate so much time and energy to highlighting Israel’s flaws when there are so many countries around the world facing complex challenges? This hypocrisy needs to be highlighted. Sen. Bernie Sanders has for too long been allowed to attack Israel unchecked. His constant attacks are disproportionate and risk damaging the Democratic Party’s image in the U.S. and abroad. Sanders’ recent claim that the U.S. was “complicit” in Israel’s occupation of Gaza and the West Bank was a case in point. I did not hear one Democratic voice publically challenge this point of view. When will Israel’s supporters within the Party stand up against Sanders and stand up for Israel? Will the new cohort of Democrats elected to office this week stand up for Israel? Sanders’ obsession with bashing Israel is biased, myopic and imbalanced. Is it reasonable to single out Israel while turning a relative blind eye to the terror and hatred tearing through every other Middle Eastern country? Is it reasonable to dedicate so much time and energy to highlighting Israel’s flaws when there are so many countries around the world facing complex challenges? This hypocrisy needs to be highlighted. It goes without saying that Sanders plays a leading role amongst the left-leaning progressives within the Democratic Party, and he influences a significant voting bloc. We all witnessed the way he was able to grow his support during his bid to be the Democratic presidential nominee. Despite losing the nomination to Hillary Clinton, the progressive movement he leads gained momentum during the election. This means that Sanders is able to get real traction on the issues that matter to him, one of which is Israel. Sanders’ opinions on Israel are damaging and consistent. He seems to regularly put out anti-Israel material, have high-profile meetings with anti-Israel campaigners and make sweeping and negative statements aimed at the Jewish state. This fall, following headlines about Israel’s occupation of Gaza and the West Bank, he met with Issa Amro, a Palestinian activist visiting America who has been arrested and prosecuted by Israeli and Palestinian Authority officials. At J-Street in the spring, he condemned “Israel’s continued occupation of Palestinian territories” as being “contrary to fundamental American values.” Sanders’ actions mean that the anti-Israel argument is now becoming more legitimate. True allies of Israel cannot just sit by without responding, especially given Sanders’ outsized role within the Democratic Party. While he is free to have his own views, if the party wants to be seen as pro-Israel, then elected officials need to stand up and counter these opinions head on. By staying silent, Democrats are feeding the perception that the Democratic Party is increasingly becoming an anti-Israel party. This is of course not the case. I have spoken to decision makers and privately, they are very critical of Sanders. But talking privately is no longer enough. If you are pro-Israel then you need to defend her publically. We do not want to mimic center-left parties in Europe where, for example, the once staunchly pro-Israel U.K. Labour Party is now led by a man who once extended an open-armed invitation to Hezbollah and Hamas to visit Parliament. Changes are afoot within the Democratic Party, with new governors coming into power in New Jersey and Virginia, and a string of state legislative election victories last week. The resurgence of the Democrats on a local level, on the heels of four successive defeats in special congressional elections during the Trump administration’s first year in office, could place President Trump under considerable pressure. What is happening is a slow anti-Israel erosion within some quarters of the Democratic Party. There are prominent voices that could turn the tide, but they need to mobilize before more damage is done. They could move the barometer on Israel and combat Sanders with one statement, but they don’t. They are silent when Israel and the Democratic Party need them most. Rosen is president of the American Jewish Congress
AJCongress President Rosen offers condolences to Argentinian President Macri for loss of lives in New York terror attack, as he insists “Christians, Muslims, Jews and everyone” share universal values of freedom and tolerance
Monday, November 13, 2017 - 10:56am
Jack Rosen hosted a private dinner at his New York home in the presence of Robert De Niro and Len Balvatnik Jack Rosen, President of the American Jewish Congress, hosted Argentinian President Mauricio Macri for a dinner in his honour at his New York home last night in the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack in New York, which claimed the lives of five Argentinian nationals, one of whom was Jewish. Following on from Macri’s decisive victory in the mid-term Argentinian elections last month, the leaders expressed their mutual solidarity with all victims of terror, the Argentinian people and the citizens of New York, as they committed to further promoting universal values of freedom and tolerance as an antidote to the scourge of radical Islamic terror. “All of us share these kinds of values,” Mr. Rosen told the President at their meeting, “Christians, Muslims, Jews and everyone”. Speaking at the meeting of the two leaders, Mr. Rosen offered his “condolences and sorrow for the Argentinians who came here as tourists and lost their lives”, as he expressed his hopes for renewed cooperation between Americans and Argentinians in the areas of investment and diplomacy. Commending President Macri’s achievements for Argentina and Latin America as a whole, Mr. Rosen added that America “was rooting” for Argentinian success. Looking to a new future of mutual cooperation between Argentina and global leaders, President Macri said there was “no sense in trying to build walls” as he heralded the opportunities presented by globalisation and rapidly advancing technology to “invite the world to be part of the best opportunity of the next 20 years: Argentina”. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu heralded “a new era” in Israel’s relations with Argentina on an official state visit to Argentina in September, having first been introduced to President Macri at the American Jewish Congress’s Mayor’s conference. The American Jewish Congress is committed to ensuring the survival and security of Israel, and protecting Jewish communities around the world http://www.diplomacy.co.il/announcements/3927-ajcongress-president-rosen-offers-condolences-to-argentinian-president-macri-for-loss-of-lives-in-new-york-terror-attack-as-he-insists-christians-muslims-jews-and-everyone-share-universal-values-of-freedom-and-tolerance
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 4:39pm
AJCongress President Rosen offers condolences to Argentinian President Macri for loss of lives in New York terror attack, as he insists “Christians, Muslims, Jews and everyone” share universal values of freedom and tolerance
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 11:08am

Jack Rosen, President of the American Jewish Congress, hosted Argentinian President Mauricio Macri for a dinner in his honor in New York last night in the aftermath of last week’s deadly terror attack in New York which claimed the lives of five Argentinian nationals, one of whom was Jewish. Mr. Rosen and President Macri expressed their mutual solidarity with all victims of terror, the Argentinian people and the citizens of New York, as they committed to further promoting universal values of freedom and tolerance as an antidote to the scourge of radical Islamic terror. “All of us share these kinds of values,” Mr. Rosen told the President at their meeting, “Christians, Muslims, Jews and everyone”.

Speaking at the meeting of the two leaders, Mr. Rosen offered his “condolences and sorrow for the Argentinians who came here as tourists and lost their lives”, as he expressed his hopes for renewed cooperation between Americans and Argentinians in the areas of investment and diplomacy. Commending President Macri’s achievements for Argentina and Latin America as a whole, Mr. Rosen added that America “was rooting” for Argentinian success.

Looking to a new future of mutual cooperation between Argentina and global leaders, President Macri said there was “no sense in trying to build walls” as he heralded the opportunities presented by globalisation and rapidly advancing technology to “invite the world to be part of the best opportunity of the next 20 years: Argentina”.