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JP Updates
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 11:56am
The champagne bottles went popping off in the Prime Minister’s office on Wednesday as Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton delivered a speech that gave Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu the impression that his aggressive campaign against President Barack Obama’s Iran deal was somewhat justified.

... “While we do not agree with her positive assessment of the agreement that was reached by the P5+1 nations with Iran, we are grateful for her clear message today that if Iran tries to cheat, she will not hesitate to pursue military action,” American Jewish Congress (AJC) President Jack Rosen, a close friend of the Democratic presidential hopeful, said in a statement. “We also appreciate her total rejection of viewing Iran as a trustworthy partner, but rather as the subject for rigorously implementing this agreement through distrust and verification.”
DEBKAfile
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 11:55am
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton Wednesday endorsed the Iran deal in a speech at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. American Jewish Congress President Jack Rosen responded with this statement:

“As Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton helped create the sanctions infrastructure that brought Iran to the negotiating table and ensured that Iran did not attain a nuclear weapon. While we do not agree with her positive assessment of the agreement that was reached by the P5+1 nations with Iran, we are grateful for her clear message today that if Iran tries to cheat, she will not hesitate to pursue military action," Jack Rosen said. "We also appreciate her total rejection of viewing Iran as a trustworthy partner, but rather as the subject for rigorously implementing this agreement through distrust and verification.”
WFSB
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 11:50am
Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut says he will support the nuclear deal with Iran. Blumenthal says the agreement "using diplomacy, not military force, is the best path now available to prevent a nuclear-armed Iran."

... Many Democrats and Republicans have been strongly against it, and the American Jewish Congress said in a statement "While we agree with Senator Blumenthal that a better deal should have been reached, at the end of the day, we disagree that this deal is better than no deal."
Jerusalem Post
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 - 12:16am
No longer is it a secret that Israel and several Gulf states see each other in a new light, and are having quiet conversations. Today, the discussion is widening from one about defending against the common Iranian enemy to finding other areas of mutual regional interest. It doesn’t take a huge imagination to understand the potentially enormous benefits of a political breakthrough between the “Start-Up Nation” and a group of oil-driven economies in search of investment ideas.

Though Gaza poses the greatest challenge, it also receives inordinate attention because its needs are so great. Hamas’ iron fist, and its continuing misappropriation of reconstruction materials to build more tunnels to attack Israel is a problem that hasn’t gone away. Still, the pace of outside efforts to target funds for rebuilding homes, schools and hospitals has been quickening. Though it is underreported in the West, there appears to be an Arab realization that economic development is the essential path forward.
Horizons: Journal of International Relations and Sustainable Development
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 4:00pm
If the many practitioners of politics around the globe can agree on one thing, it is the notion that “timing is everything.” The 2002 Middle East peace initiative—referred to as the Saudi Peace Plan or the Arab Peace Plan—has languished for well over a decade as a striking example of an idea that failed the “timing is everything” test. But it is an idea whose time may be coming soon. While the Plan offered the bold promise of a wide-ranging rapprochement between Israel and its neighbors, it arose in the midst of the Al Aqsa Intifadah—the second and bloodier of the two Palestinian uprisings—claiming the lives of roughly 1,000 Israelis and 3,000 Palestinians between 2000 and 2005.
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